A Perfect Circle lament the new beatitudes of Trump era America

A Perfect Circle are set to release a new album in 2018, their first in 14 years, and this month they’ve unveiled a teaser track entitled, “The Doomed”.

It’s musically and lyrically explosive. As the song progresses, vocalist Maynard James Keenan paints a dark and disturbing picture of a society hell bent on shrugging off responsibility for protecting its most vulnerable members: “The new beatitude: Good luck, you’re on your own.” In a statement, Keenan said of “The Doomed, “In light of this current difficult and polarised social, spiritual and political climate, we artist types need to open our big mouths and share the light a little louder.”

“The Doomed”

Behold a new Christ
Behold the same old horde
Gather at the altering
New beginning, new word
And the word was death
And the word was without light
The new beatitude:
“Good luck, you’re on your own”

Blessed are the fornicates
May we bend down to be their whores
Blessed are the rich
May we labour, deliver them more
Blessed are the envious
Bless the slothful, the wrathful, the vain
Blessed are the gluttonous
May they feast us to famine and war

What of the pious, the pure of heart, the peaceful?
What of the meek, the mourning, and the merciful?
All doomed
All doomed

Behold a new Christ
Behold the same old horde
Gather at the altering
New beginning, new word
And the word was death
And the word was without light
The new beatitude:
“Good luck…”

What of the pious, the pure of heart, the peaceful?
What of the meek, the mourning, and the merciful?
What of the righteous?
What of the charitable?
What of the truthful, the dutiful, the decent?

Doomed are the poor
Doomed are the peaceful
Doomed are the meek
Doomed are the merciful
For the word is now death
And the word is now without light
The new beatitude:
“Fuck the doomed, you’re on your own”

The hermit and the thieves

Once some thieves came to an old hermit and said, “We are taking everything in your cell.” He answered, “Take whatever you need, my children.” They took almost everything in the cell and left. But they missed a little bag of money that was hidden. The elder picked it up and went after them, crying, “Children! You forgot something!” The thieves were amazed. Not only did they not take the money, but they returned everything that they had taken. “Truly,” they said, “this is a man of God.”

What is the cost of our economic success?

the-whore-of-babylon-by-tentaclegoat
“The Whore of Babylon” by Tentaclegoat

“Fallen! Fallen is Babylon the Great! … The kings of the earth committed adultery with her, and the merchants of the earth grew rich from her excessive luxuries.” (Revelation 18:2-3)

I don’t know about you, but I get uncomfortable with the market mechanisms that hold up our economies, while exploiting everyone and everything they touch. What sort of bills are we racking up?

The Yin Yang of World Hunger

The-yin and-yang-of-world hunger-Imgur“The yin and yang of world hunger” by Imgur

I think this yin-yang inspired image nicely illustrates the complete lack of balance between developed and developing nations! And as a citizen of a developed nation I find the prophecy of Jesus quite sobering: “Woe to you who are well fed now, for you will go hungry. Woe to you who laugh now, for you will mourn and weep.” (Luke 6:25)

Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes

In their book, “Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes: Removing Cultural Blinders to Better Understand the Bible”,  E. Randolph Richards and Brandon J. O’Brien observe, “There is a discernible pattern by which Western readers read-and even misread-Scripture.” For example, “Our cultural mores tell us sexual modesty is necessary while economic modesty is considerate: preferable but not necessary.” I find it fascinative to watch how “figurative” the Biblical literalists get when one suggests economic misbehaviour could be as indictive of unorthodox Christianity as sexual misbehaviour.