The morning that Death was killed by Steve Turner

The morning that Death was killed

I woke in a place that was dark
The air was spicy and still
I was bandaged from head to foot
The morning that death was killed.

I rose from a mattress of stone
I folded my clothes on the sill
I heard the door rolling open
The morning that death was killed.

I walked alone in the garden
The birds in the branches trilled
It felt like a new beginning
The morning that death was killed.

Mary, she came there to find me
Peter with wonder was filled
And John came running and jumping
The morning that death was killed.

My friends were lost in amazement
My father, I knew, was thrilled
Things were never the same again
After the morning that death was killed.

– Steve Turner

Holy Thursday by William Blake

Songs of Experience: Holy Thursday

Is this a holy thing to see,
In a rich and fruitful land,
Babes reduced to misery,
Fed with cold and usurous hand?

Is that trembling cry a song!
Can it be a song of joy?
And so many children poor,
It is a land of poverty!

And their sun does never shine.
And their fields are bleak & bare.
And their ways are fill’d with thorns
It is eternal winter there.

For where-e’er the sun does shine,
And where-e’er the rain does fall:
Babe can never hunger there,
Nor poverty the mind appall.

– William Blake

The Nail Man by Steve Turner

Which one was it
that held the nails
and then hammered them
into place?

Did he hit them
out of anger,
or a simple
sense of duty?

Was it a job
that had to be done,
or a good day’s work
in the open air?

And when they
clawed past bone
and bit into wood,
was it like all the others,
or did history
shudder a little
beneath the head
of that hammer?

Was he still there,
packing away his tools,
when ‘It is finished’
was uttered to the throng,
or was he at home
washing his hands
and getting ready
for the night?

Will he be
among the forgiven
on that Day of Days,
his sin having been slain
by his own savage spike?

– Steve Turner

The cast of Christmas reassembles for Easter by Steve Turner

The cast of Christmas reassembles for Easter

Take the wise men to the Emperor’s palace.
Wash their hands in water.
Get them to say something about truth.
Does anyone know any good Jewish jokes?
The one about a carpenter
who thought he was a King?
The one about the Saviour
who couldn’t save himself?
The shepherds should stand with the chorus.
They have a big production number –
‘Barabbas, We Love You Baby’.
Mary? She can move to the front.
We have a special section reserved
for family and close friends.
Tell her that we had to cut the manger up.
We needed the wood for something else.
The star I’m afraid I can’t use.
There are no stars in this show.
The sky turns black with sorrow.
The earth shakes with terror.
Hold on to the frankincense.
We’ll need that for the garden scene.
Angels? He could do with some angels.
Avenging angels.
Merciful angels.
He could really do with some angels.
Baby Jesus.
Step this way please.
My! How you’ve grown!

– Steve Turner

Living the Resurrection

William_bouguereau_women_at_the_tomb What does resurrection mean for you? This is where differing views on eschatology and apocalyptics have profound implications for discipleship.

If you view the future as relevant for the present only in so far as the last judgement can be calculated to the near future, then chances you’ll treat the resurrection mostly as something to be awaited (as in, End Times events) or remembered (as in, the Easter event).

If, however, you view the future as relevant for how we live in the present, irrespective the nearness of the last judgement, then the resurrection changes everything, right here and now. For it means living the future day and age in this day and age, and watching the sparks fly.

For consider, what if we lived “as if” loving your enemies was an ethic for the present and not just the future? What if we lived “as if” the bottom line was not the bottom line? What if we lived “as if” the threat of death (from terrorists, militant democracies and others) had no hold on us? How world shaking that would be.

That’s what Easter is for me. It’s a call to apocalyptic awareness now.

This post is a contribution to the April SynchroblogDO YOU LIVE UNDER A ROCK? Check out the other great posts for this month’s synchroblog:

Phil Wyman at Square No More – Apocalyptic fervor spurs benevolent giving

Marta Layton at Marta’s Mathoms – Getting Out From Behind The Rock

Alan Knox at the assembling of the church – Living The Resurrected Life

Mike Victorino at  Simply A Night Owl – Crawling Out From Under A Rock

John Paul Todd at E4Unity – Still Asleep In the Light

Patrick Oden at Ravens – A Resurrection

Brambonius at Brambonius’ blog in english – hiding the Resurrection life like a candle under a bucket?

George Elerick at The Love Revolution – (for)getting the resurrection

Liz Dyer at Grace Rules – I Will Answer That Question In A Minute, But First, I Want To Talk About Jesus

Jeff Goins at Jeff Goins Writer – Resurrection

Tammy Carter at Blessing the Beloved – Rock and a Hard Place

Kathy Escobar at the carnival in my head – little miracles

Christen Hansel at Greener Grass – Resurrection Rhythm