Evidence for Christ from non-Christians

Surprising as it may be for some, there is actually quite a bit of historical evidence for Jesus from non-Christian sources. This is the best kind of evidence as if anything it is biased against Christianity, rather than for it, the writers having no vested interest in proving the historicity of Jesus.   Evidence from … Continue reading Evidence for Christ from non-Christians

The Gemini twins in the Bible

Castor and Pollux were twin half-brothers in Greek and Roman mythology, known together as the Dioskouroi. They were sons of Leda by two different fathers. Castor was the mortal son of Tyndareus, the king of Sparta, while Pollux was the divine son of Zeus. When Castor was killed, Pollux asked Zeus to let him share … Continue reading The Gemini twins in the Bible

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Curious about Lilith?

I get people asking me about Lilith from time but there’s not actually much I can say. Lilith doesn’t play any significant part in Christianity. While there is a "lilith" mentioned in the Hebrew scriptures (Isaiah 34:14 for those who want to look it up) it is simply a passing reference to a night creature … Continue reading Curious about Lilith?

Is YHWH just a Hebrew version of Zeus?

Is YHWH equivalent to other gods? Just a Hebrew version of Zeus for instance? With a wife even? No, YHWH’s domain is not limited to the sky. Nor did YHWH come into being at some point like Zeus did. Granted there is some evidence to suggest early Hebrews had a more limited conception of YHWH, … Continue reading Is YHWH just a Hebrew version of Zeus?

Jesus as Dionysus and Demeter

In the western imagination YHWH and his messiah have most often been equated with Zeus, lord of the sky, and Apollo, his light giving son ... or is it sun? And yet, the scriptures again and again speak YHWH as Lord of earth, sky and sea and everything in them. Would it not be just … Continue reading Jesus as Dionysus and Demeter

Greek Mythology in the New Testament

"And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it." (Matthew 16:18) And I tell you that interacting with contemporary Pagans has given me greater appreciation for just how often the messianic Jews of the New Testament encountered and … Continue reading Greek Mythology in the New Testament

Behemoth and Leviathan

I found this image of Behemoth and Leviathan on DeviantArt by a person calling themselves PutridusCor, which seems to be the moniker for a guy named Aidan in Canada. Behemoth and Leviathan are two enigmatic animals mentioned in the Old Testament book of Job. Some equate Behemoth and Leviathan with a hippopotamus and a crocodile respectively, others … Continue reading Behemoth and Leviathan

Jesus of Nazareth: Lightning Thief

Who said theology needed to be dry? Last weekend I found myself in a conversation with my sons about the Greek gods and the ancient Christians. You see, my pre-teen sons are both into the Percy Jackson books and movies this year, and for the uninitiated Percy Jackson is the son of Poseidon, the Greek … Continue reading Jesus of Nazareth: Lightning Thief

Genesis: An Authoritative Myth?

Genesis has been on my mind this weekend, so I thought I would cite a few passages from “Inspiration and Incarnation: Evangelicals and the Problem of the Old Testament,” the infamous book by Peter Enns, which I happen to really enjoy. What I like about Inspiration and Incarnation is that it moves beyond the entrenched … Continue reading Genesis: An Authoritative Myth?

Respecting Strange Gods

How should Christians engage with the gods and goddesses of alternative religious movements? Obviously, since we affirm YHWH as the one true God and Jesus as the one true incarnation of God, the worship of other gods and goddesses is always going to be a problematic issue for us. But does that give Christians licence … Continue reading Respecting Strange Gods

Joseph Campbell and the Hero’s Journey

Why is Joseph Campbell important? For those of you not familiar with him, Joseph Campbell was an American mythology professor, writer, and speaker, best known for his book, The Hero with a Thousand Faces. The journey of the hero, what he called the monomyth, figured prominently in Campbell's comparative studies, and his writings on the … Continue reading Joseph Campbell and the Hero’s Journey